TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (15–21 July 2017)

Can't decide which shows to watch or listen to next week? Here are 10 programmes you won't want to miss...

The Sweet Makers. (Image Credit: BBC/Wall to Wall South/Joe Jackson)
The Sweet Makers. (Image Credit: BBC/Wall to Wall South/Joe Jackson)
 
 
Archive On 4 – The Real Summer Of Love 
Radio 4 
Saturday 15 July, 8.00pm
 
It’s 50 years since Haight Ashbury in San Francisco became the centre of the burgeoning hippy movement? What did all this mean to ordinary British people? Not much, suggests historian Dominic Sandbrook as he looks back at a party that, for all the sense of freedom and colour the 1960s brought, was mostly happening elsewhere.
 
 
 
Poldark 
BBC One
Sunday 16 July, 9.00pm 
 
As ever, things are eventful out west in an episode that finds Dwight traumatised by his experiences in France, Ross giving away land to help out the peasantry and George once again doing the wrong thing for the wrong reasons. There’s more period drama on Monday 17 July as Ripper Street (9.30pm, BBC Two) continues. 
 
 
Poldark. (Image Credit: BBC/Mammoth Screen/Craig Hardie)
 
 
Cold War: Stories From The Big Freeze 
Radio 4
Monday 17 July, 1.45pm
 
The weekday series looking back at the face-off between east and west concludes with episodes that take in protests against nuclear weapons, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Presented by former BBC diplomatic correspondent, Bridget Kendall. 
 
 
 
Public Indecency: Queer Art In Britain 
Radio 4
Monday 17 July, 4.00pm
 
In a three-part series made in partnership with Tate Britain, Simon Callow explores LGBTQ life through the lens of the arts. He begins with artists and writers working in the late 19th century who wouldn’t have defined themselves as homosexual, yet whose work dealt with, in a necessarily coded fashion, gender, difference and desire. 
 
 
 
The Vikings: Foe Or Friend? A Timewatch Guide 
BBC Four
Tuesday 18 July, 9.00pm
 
In June 793, seafaring Scandinavians attacked the monastery at Lindisfarne on the Northumbrian coast. The history of Europe hared off in a new direction. Drawing on the BBC archives, Alice Roberts considers changing views of the cultural legacy of the Vikings and looks at how they’ve been portrayed on TV since the 1960s.
 
 
 
When Football Banned Women 
Channel 4
Tuesday 18 July, 10.00pm
 
A hundred years ago, with men away at the front, women’s football in Britain attracted crowds of 60,000. But then, in 1921, the Football Association banned women from playing professional matches and using its grounds. Clare Balding explores why this monumentally sexist decision was taken.
 
 
When Football Banned Women. (Photo: Eleanor Bentall)
 
 
When Yorkshire Played New York 
Radio 4
Wednesday 19 July, 11.00am
 
In 1964, around the same time as The Beatles were making their US debut, the Brylcreem boys of the Yorkshire County Cricket side, including Geoffrey Boycott, visited New York to play at Staten Island Cricket Club. Presenter David Prest looks back at the visit in a documentary that also offers a social history of the game in the US.
 
 
 

Pick of the week 

The Sweet Makers: A Tudor Treat 
BBC Two
Wednesday 19 July, 8.00pm
 
In a new living history series, a quartet of confectioners use original recipes to recreate the sugary treats of a bygone ages. First up, that means heading for Haddon Hall in Derbyshire to prepare a 16th-century style sugar banquet. Presented by historians Annie Gray and Emma Dabiri.
 
 
 
The Long View 
Radio 4
Thursday 20 July, 9.00am
 
In 1905, a blaze broke out at a lodging house in Glasgow. The Watson Street fire resulted in 39 deaths and another 24 people were injured. Jonathan Freedland looks at parallels between this tragedy and other historic fires, and the recent disaster at Grenfell Tower in west London.
 
 
 
Who Do You Think You Are? 
BBC One
Thursday 20 July, 9.00pm
 
Clare Balding is the latest celebrity to trace her genealogy. She’s especially curious about her maternal great grandfather. Was he, as family chatter seemed to suggest, gay? Plus she heads to New York to hear stories of some remarkable American relatives.
 
 
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