TV & radio: what to tune in to next week (16–22 January 2015)

Can't decide what programmes to watch or listen to this week? Here are 10 you won't want to miss...

Wolf Hall, BBC Two, 21 January at 9pm. (BBC/Company Productions Ltd)

Sound of Song
BBC Four
Friday 16th January, 9.00pm

Neil Brand looks at the elements that make a great song: how they are written, performed and recorded – and also how we listen to music. First up, he considers how the microphone changed the way artists sang. Bing Crosby’s crooning, we learn, was once regarded as scandalously intimate and suggestive.

Find out more here.

 

Archive on 4: Musn’t Grumble – The Noble British Art of Complaining
Radio 4
Saturday 17th January, 8.00pm

Writer Bidisha explores the way we British like a good grumble. Which is confusing because, as the title here hints, we often introduce complaints with an apology or a self-deprecating remark. Those helping Bidisha figure out how this came about include classicist and comedian Natalie Haynes.

Find out more here.

 

The Inflating Shopping Basket
Radio 4
Sunday 18th January, 1.30pm

Using annual statistics as his starting point, Andrew Webb looks at how our grocery-shopping habits have changed since 1947. It’s a documentary that takes in the development of brands and advertising in the 1970s and 1980s, and the invention of the ready meal.

Find out more here.

9 ways our food shopping habits have changed since 1947: click here to read.

 

Call the Midwife
BBC One
Sunday 18th January, 8.00pm

The hit drama returns for a fourth series, and a new nurse, Barbara Gilbert, gets off to a bad start at Nonnatus House. Taking its cues from the past in a very different fashion, Up The Women (BBC Two, Wednesday 21st January, 10.05pm), Jessica Hynes’ suffragette sitcom, is back this week too.

Find out more here.

 

Great British Railway Journeys
BBC Two
Monday 19th January, 6.30pm

Michael Portillo yet again rides the rails, guided on his way by his battered copy of Bradshaw’s. First up, he heads from the East Midlands to Lindisfarne, via Grantham, birthplace of one Margaret Hilda Thatcher, under whom Portillo served as a junior minister. Continues every weekday.

Find out more here.

 

The Eichmann Show
BBC Two
Tuesday 20th January, 9.00pm

Martin Freeman and Anthony LaPaglia head the cast in a docu-drama recalling how the 1961 trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem came to be broadcast to the world. The coverage of the event led to a new interest in the Holocaust and a greater understanding of its horrors.

Find out more here.

 

The Hidden Killers of the Tudor Home
BBC Four
Tuesday 20th January, 9.00pm

Dr Suzannah Lipscomb looks back at domestic life in the 16th century, an age when explorers brought back exotic goods previously never seen in Europe. And some of which were a danger to life and limb. Plus, how ideas about the idea of ‘home’ developed during the era.

Find out more here.

Toys and games that killed in Tudor England: click here to read.

 

Pick of the Week...

Wolf Hall
BBC Two
Wednesday 21st January, 9.00pm

Hugely anticipated and, on the evidence of episode one, utterly justifying the hype, the BBC’s adaptation of Hilary Mantel’s novels arrives on our screens. Mark Rylance holds the attention throughout as Thomas Cromwell, whom we first meet as a trusted advisor to ageing and out-of-royal-favour Cardinal Wolsey (Jonathan Pryce).

Find out more here.

Wolf Halls: take a look inside the properties where the new BBC series is filmed – click here to read.

Wolf Hall: a look at Thomas Cromwell on screen – click here to read.

 

The Secret Horse: Quest for the True Appaloosa
BBC Four
Wednesday 21st January, 9.00pm

Equine enthusiast Scott Engstrom thinks the spotted Appaloosa horse made its way to North America from Asia rather than Europe, as most believe. If she’s right, we may have to revisit what we think we know about human patterns of migration to the New World. A travelogue following Engstrom’s journey to Kyrgyzstan in search of Appaloosa.

Find out more here.

 

Surviving the Holocaust: Freddie Knoller’s War
BBC Two
Thursday 22nd January, 9.30pm

Freddie Knoller, now 93, looks back on his life. It’s a truly remarkable story, which encompasses living in Nazi-occupied Paris while using false papers to hide the fact he was Jewish, joining the French Resistance and eventually being sent to Auschwitz.

Find out more here.

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